WORKING REMOTELY … REMOTE WORKERS SEE A 20% TO 55% INCREASE IN PRODUCTIVITY

Working remotely
… remote workers see a 20% to 55% increase in productivity

By 2020, it’s expected that half of the workforce will be remote. This is not only something employees are demanding, but it is being legislated in countries like the UK. One survey found that 43 percent of employees would take a flex work arrangement over a raise. There are many big-name companies that support remote work for a surprising variety of jobs. Flexibility includes the option to work less for less pay; for example, a four-day work week. Flex work is extending into vacation policy with companies like Netflix and Virgin moving to unlimited leave policies to help drive productivity of creatives in an outcome-based work environment.  (page 29)

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The Five Golden Rules of Job Reference Etiquette

Looking For a Job Promotion, Relationships Are Critical

DETROIT, MI (June 9, 2016) – It makes good business sense – and is respectful professional etiquette – to stay in touch with your former bosses, says Allison & Taylor, the nation’s oldest professional reference checking firm.

As your career advances, your efforts to stay connected with past employers could pay dividends many times over when they provide you with favorable professional references.  Conversely, failing maintain a solid relationship with your references could have long-reaching professional consequences.

“As an employer, if a prospective employee’s former boss neglected to return your call looking for a professional reference, what message would that convey?” asks Jeff Shane, of Allison & Taylor.  “Oftentimes, job seekers pay close attention to their resumes and interview skills, but fail to nurture their professional references…and a personal commentary can make or break a successful job search.”

To enhance the chances Allison & Taylor suggests you follow these 5 Golden Rules of Job Reference Etiquette:

1.Call your former bosses and ask them if they are willing to be good job references for you. Be sure to thank them for supporting you in your job search if they agree.

2.Let them know each and every time you give out their name and email address.

3.Keep your former positive references informed of your experiences in climbing the corporate ladder and your educational progress. Provide them with career updates. He/she will be more inclined to see you in a stronger light as you progress.

4.Remember that spending time with a potential employer takes valuable time out of your former bosses’ day, so try to give something back. For instance, after receiving a good job reference, write a personal thank-you letter or (at a minimum) send an email. Better still, send a thank-you note with a gift card, or offer to take your former boss to lunch/dinner.

5.If you win the new position, call or email your former boss and thank them again for the positive references. At the same time, you can provide your new professional contact information.

Additionally, it’s critical to be certain of the feedback from your professional references.  If you are not 100 percent convinced that your professional references and past employers will relay positive comments about you to prospective employers, have them checked out.  A professional reference check can either put your mind at ease, or supply you with the critical information and evidence that may be blocking your job search efforts.

Allison & Taylor estimates that 50% of their references come back as “lukewarm” or “negative”.  If a reference provides unfavorable or inaccurate information to a prospective employer, there are steps that can be taken to rectify the situation. You can take steps to prevent this continued spread of negative information, either through a Cease & Desist letter or through more aggressive legal recourse.

To find out more about reference checking, please visit Allison & Taylor.

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About AllisonTaylor

AllisonTaylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. AllisonTaylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit http://www.allisontaylor.com/.

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Media Contact

Jeff Shane

Jeff@AllisonTaylor.com

800-890-5645 (toll-free USA/Canada)

+1-248-672-4200

AllisonTaylor.com