You’ve Been Sexually Harassed: What Happens to Your Job Prospects and References If You’re Not Famous?

Allison Taylor Reference Checking Tells Sexual Harassment Victims How to Protect Their Job Reference, Reputation and Future Livelihood

DETROIT (Dec. 13, 2017) – According to Allison Taylor Reference Checking, reporting sexual harassment can cost the brave women and sometimes men who report sexual harassment by a boss or co-worker in their current job: it can cost them the next job, too.

What happens to a job reference after making a report to HR, the legal department or filing a sexual harassment suit?

Too often, harassers get a simple slap on the wrist. Sadly, most of us aren’t famous movie stars with the clout to move on to the next job. Perpetrators too often get by with few consequences, while the brave complainant puts his or her career—and livelihood—on the line.

The average person has no choice but to worry about their next paycheck. But a bad boss can slander or defame you when you apply for your next job. Rumors that badmouth the wrong person can circulate for too long, and people may even collude to keep you unemployed by blacklisting you. On top of that, HR may not be very empathetic about the issue and may even say the wrong thing to protect their interests.

Whether you’re being pressured to discuss or even to have sex with your boss or a co-worker, forced to listen to foul language or slurs, you need to figure out what to do about that job reference, especially if you have worked at the place of harassment for any length of time.

Here are steps recommended for anyone’s future employment to­ look solid.

  1. Document the sexual harassment of employer by discovering what they say about you.

Hire a professional service like ours to make actual calls to your former boss or employer. Our very discreet reference check process gives you an accurate, documented report, viewable in your private, secure, online account.
2.   Prepare a remedy like a Cease & Desist Letter for Poor to Bad Job References

If you discover bad job references, we can help. Fight back hard with a “cease and desist” letter written by experienced professionals. With our close to 100% success rate, you can change the game and protect your future.

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About AllisonTaylor

AllisonTaylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. We are highly acclaimed with employers, employees and the media alike. Compliments and mentionsfrom influential publications and writers at The Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, The New York Times, Workplace Bullying Institute, ABC Newswire, Forbes, USA Today, Hcareers, Fortune and MyFox News provide insight into our services. AllisonTaylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit https://www.allisontaylor.com/

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Media Contact

Jeff Shane
Jeff@AllisonTaylor.com
800-890-5645 (toll-free USA/Canada)
+1-248-672-4200
AllisonTaylor.com

Employees Crave Justice in The Workplace

DETROIT (Jan. 11, 2017) – As we enter 2017, workplace trends are emerging that will have significant ramifications for employers and job seekers alike. 

A key theme is employee demand for a more flexible working environment that will allow greater latitude for a “work/life balance”.  Employers wishing to attract – and retain – new talent will need to be mindful of this general trend, as well as the need to utilize newer, non-traditional tools such as instant messaging, people analytics, etc.  Another key trend: reference checks will be vetted differently than in the past, with supervisory references gaining increasing prominence.

Some specific trends we expect to see for 2017 include:

  1. Workplace well-being becomes critical for attracting new talent. While compensation pay has traditionally been a leading prerequisite for all job seekers, a desire for workplace flexibility has risen dramatically in importance. Yet, it is estimated that only a third of global corporations offer such flexibility. Of those that do offer at least some degree of workplace flexibility, many are not promoting this benefit to job seekers who increasingly spend more time researching companies before applying for new employment.

This suggests a considerable opportunity for companies to not only increase their degree of workplace flexibility, but to market this benefit more aggressively to prospective new employees.

There are several components to overall work flex, which include:

  • Working from the home, facilitated using new technological tools
  • Elimination of strict office hours
  • Adoption of “casual days” with reduced formal business attire

2. New Internal Communications Tools Replace Email.  As highly tech-savvy employees enter the marketplace, businesses will utilize more efficient internal communication tools such as text messaging, live chat and instant messaging, which will increasingly replace traditional emails.

3. Blended Workplaces Become Increasingly Predominant. The use of blended workforces, where freelance workers team up with full-time employees on project collaboration, is on the rise. An estimated 40% of workforces will be composed of freelancers in the next few years, reducing corporate benefits/health care costs. By necessity, these freelancers will need to interact more frequently with full-time employees than previously.

4. The Reference Checking Process Takes an Unconventional Turn.  A significant change in the reference checking process is that employers are more likely to call a job seeker’s former supervisors, rather than follow the traditional route of contacting Human Resources.  This is because employers have concluded that former supervisors tend to be far more talkative about previous employees than Human Resources – and a talkative, knowledgeable reference is exactly what they seek.

Related to this, a 2014 survey by the Workplace Bullying Institute (workplacebullying.org) identified 27% of responders as having current or past direct experience with abusive conduct at work.  Bosses constituted the majority of bullies. (http://www.workplacebullying.org/wbiresearch/wbi-2014-us-survey/)

5.  References Become a Powerful Extension of a Job Seeker’s Resume. A strong resume is only part of the employment equation. Employers look to references to provide critical employment information, and a wise job seeker should treat their references as a powerful extension of their resume.  References should be chosen careful, and job seekers should have a cultivated list of references readily available (in a similar format/font as their resume) to be given to prospective employers.  See a modern reference list here: https://www.allisontaylor.com/sample-employment-reference-list.asp

6. Virtual reality tools revolutionize recruiting and training.  Revenue from virtual reality hardware is projected to reach over eight billion (2014-2018). It is likely that employees experiencing this technology outside of work will ultimately desire similar technological tools at the office. Some companies such as General Mills already utilize a virtual reality tour of their offices as a tool to showcase the company to prospective employees at corporate job fairs.

 

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About AllisonTaylor

AllisonTaylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. We are highly acclaimed with employers, employees and the media alike. Compliments and mentions from influential publications and writers at The Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, The New York Times, Workplace Bullying Institute, ABC Newswire, Forbes, USA Today, Hcareers, Fortune and MyFox News provide insight into our services. AllisonTaylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit http://www.allisontaylor.com/.

How even the smallest weight gain can hurt your job chances

From theStar.com

The suddenly reluctant zipper can bring more than a sting of self-consciousness. A new study from the journal Plos One out this month found slight weight gain can hurt a job seeker’s employment chances — especially a woman’s.

The authors, a team of Scottish and Canadian researchers, already knew that overweight applicants face discrimination on the job hunt. They wondered if going up just one size could trigger similar prejudice.

In 2013, they told a group of 60 men and 60 women to imagine themselves as company recruiters looking at photos of prospective hires. The snapshots showed four men and four women, all white and expressionless, at various, digitally enhanced weights. Each face reflected what doctors consider healthy body weights. (For example, a 5-foot-7 woman who weighs between 121 and 158 pounds would not be medically considered obese.)

The authors said they wanted to test for response to size, so they stuck with one race:

The researchers told the group that the candidates had identical resumés. Then came the questionnaire: Based on your gut reactions, how likely would you be to hire each, on a scale of 1 (extremely unlikely) to 7 (extremely likely) for customer-facing roles or no-contact gigs?

A human resources manager might warn that deciding on the basis of a photo could invite a lawsuit. But the respondents made snap judgments. To faux recruiters of both genders, thinner faces registered as more hirable than the heavier ones, though the effect was stronger for roles that involved interaction with customers. The “original” versions pulled an average score of 4.84, while the modified, heavier mugs got 4.61.

The disadvantage, however, was stronger for larger women than for larger men. Respondents rated them 0.66 lower on average, compared to the 0.26 they docked the men.

“These results affirm that even a marginal increase in weight appears to have a negative impact on the hirability ratings of female job applicants,” the authors wrote. “For women, it seems, even seemingly minute changes to the shape, size and weight of the body are important.”

Co-author Dennis Nickson, a business professor at University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, said women tend to be judged more harshly for their appearances because of unfair societal expectations. Thin women who wear modest makeup appear more competent in the workplace and even take home higher earnings than their similarly skilled colleagues who weigh more or spurn cosmetics, studies have shown. (Other work has found that men, regardless of beauty, simply look more inherently skilled, and indeed the respondents in this study rated male faces, on average, a full point more employable than female ones.)

 

Read more here

Hiring should be increasing over the next 3 years

The race is on

As global CEOs race to secure the talent, innovation and capabilities for growth – are Canadian CEOs keeping pace?

KPMG recently conducted a survey of nearly 1,300 CEOs from around the world, including 53 Canadian CEOs, asking them about their plans and concerns over the next three years and what we heard provides some interesting insights.

Optimism is high

Overall, Canadian CEOs are confident in the outlook of their organizations and industries, and their ability to outperform against the general economic backdrop. They are embracing technology, leveraging data and analytics, and pursuing innovation.

While this all sounds promising, are Canadian CEOs truly focusing on the right issues and taking full advantage of the best solutions? The significant contrasts that exist from their global counterparts suggest that Canadian CEOs may want to take more cues from our international peers.

The race is on

Clearly, Canadian executives are feeling that the race is on; but it remains to be seen whether they act quickly enough and with the right focus to effectively transform and evolve. Among our findings:

  • 75 percent of CEOs agree that the next three years will be more critical to their industry than the previous 50 years;
  • 74 percent of CEOs believe their company will remain largely the same in the next 3 years;
  • 98 percent are concerned about the loyalty of customers;
  • 13 percent feel confident that they are fully prepared for a cyber-event.

Explore the report

We hope that you find this report and the insights provided useful and of interest to you and your organization.

Read the full report [PDF 2 MB]

WORKING REMOTELY … REMOTE WORKERS SEE A 20% TO 55% INCREASE IN PRODUCTIVITY

Working remotely
… remote workers see a 20% to 55% increase in productivity

By 2020, it’s expected that half of the workforce will be remote. This is not only something employees are demanding, but it is being legislated in countries like the UK. One survey found that 43 percent of employees would take a flex work arrangement over a raise. There are many big-name companies that support remote work for a surprising variety of jobs. Flexibility includes the option to work less for less pay; for example, a four-day work week. Flex work is extending into vacation policy with companies like Netflix and Virgin moving to unlimited leave policies to help drive productivity of creatives in an outcome-based work environment.  (page 29)

Companies get around talent shortage with ‘work from anywhere’ policies

70% of employees would quit their jobs for a remote-working one

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Traditionalists, beware: the new work space is everywhere

Why It’s Time to Allow Employees to Work Remotely

5 awesome lessons I learned from working remotely

4 Reasons Marissa Mayer’s No-At-Home-Work Policy Is an Epic Fail

Millennials are forcing Canadian firms to up their mobile game

70% of millennial workers would rather telecommute than come to the office

Report shows flexible work options leads to higher employee engagement

How to manage a workforce that’s spread around the globe

How a manager can be visible, remotely

Companies are failing to invest in the tools that make remote working a reality

The rise of remote working

At These 125 Companies, All Or Most Employees Work Remotely

Five Ways A Company Can Set Up Remote Workers For Success

Future of work is when employees want, where they want it: Rogers survey

10 Tips for Effective Collaboration in Remote Teams

UNLIMITED VACATION TIME: AWESOME, OR NAH-SOME?

Unlimited Vacation time: Awesome, or Nah-some?

4 Powerful Trends That Will Help Define the Workplace Environment 2016 & Beyond

New Trends for 2016  Bring  Urgency for Reference Checking, Background Checking & Reputation Management

DETROIT (Dec. 15 2015) – Looking ahead to 2016, there are both challenges – and opportunities – based on powerful trends that will help define the workplace environment for the coming years, say the employment experts at Allison & Taylor, Inc.

1.  The highly desired “Work-Life Balance” has a darker side.

In recent years, an increased emphasis on work-life balance has resulted in more companies providing added employee flexibility in allowing them to better manage their time. While this is touted as a highly desirable feature by employees, it has also created new expectations in the form of being increasingly available and responsive, e.g. in the form of after-hours emails, late-night texts that bosses expect an immediate response to, or FaceTime calls with customers in different time zones that can start well before 8am or after 5pm.  The end result: an actual decrease in work-life balance and a more overwhelmed workforce.

2.  Generation Z college graduates will be entering the workforce for the first time, with Millennials increasingly filling management positions vacated by retiring boomers. 

Generation Z’ers – born from 1995 onwards – will begin entering the workplace early in 2016. Also during 2016, more than 3 million boomers are set to retire, making way for millennials (born between 1980-1995) who will take many of their vacated management positions. These millennials will fill the leadership gap by increasingly flattening corporate hierarchies, utilizing empowerment and team-oriented tactics and urging their employers to make a more positive impact on society.

3.  More professionals will seek (or accept) short or part-time stints instead of full-time jobs.

Professionals are increasingly choosing freelance jobs in order to gain more control over their lives, have flexibility and be their own boss. By 2020, approximately 40% of Americans will be part of what has come to be called the “gig” economy.  The rise of this trend is attributed to many factors, including increased access to technology, the impact of the recession, and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) that has imposed new costs on employers.  The “gig economy” has allowed employers to hire on-demand, lower cost talent and has given rise to entrepreneurial entities such as Uber.

4.  The resurgence of boomerang employees (and subsequent challenge for other job seekers).

A boomerang employee is one that leaves a company only to ultimately return after some later date.  Many companies that once had a policy against hiring back boomerang employees in the past have since changed their policies to allow the return of such employees. Benefits of rehiring former employees include their familiarity with corporate culture and the fact that they don’t require as much training to get up to speed.  This lowers the risk factor from an employer’s perspective, making boomerang employees significant competitors to other active job seekers.

Given these trends, what are the “takeaways” for new candidates to the job market?  One is that your job references are more important than ever before.  In particular:

  1. First time entrants to the job market (Gen Z) will need to begin cultivating business references asap in anticipation of future employment applications.
  2. Job seekers anticipating “gig economy” positions with higher turnover/shorter job stints will need to ensure that their references are solid at each new place of employment.
  3. Millennials seeking to bring new skills to management positions need to ensure that their resumes reflect specific accomplishments consistent with empowerment, team-oriented strategies, etc. that are validated by their references.
  4. Boomerang employees will want to ensure that no “bridges are burned” with key previous employers, parting from these employers on good terms that allow for the possibility of future re-employment with the company.
  5. All job seekers are recommended to check their key references by utilizing a firm like Allison & Taylor (www.allisontaylor.com) a third-party reference checking organization that identifies the commentary that previous employers will offer about you to potential new employers.  Approximately half of all reference checks conducted by this organization reveal employer negativity about the job seeker, something that will likely ensure that no future job offers will be forthcoming.  Be sure to have key supervisory and Human Resources contacts checked at your former places of employment to ensure that your references will be assets, not liabilities, to your next employment position.

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About AllisonTaylor

AllisonTaylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. AllisonTaylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit http://www.allisontaylor.com/.

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Media Contact
Jeff Shane
Jeff@AllisonTaylor.com
800-890-5645 (toll-free USA/Canada)
+1-248-672-4200
AllisonTaylor.com

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