Employees Crave Justice in The Workplace

DETROIT (Jan. 11, 2017) – As we enter 2017, workplace trends are emerging that will have significant ramifications for employers and job seekers alike. 

A key theme is employee demand for a more flexible working environment that will allow greater latitude for a “work/life balance”.  Employers wishing to attract – and retain – new talent will need to be mindful of this general trend, as well as the need to utilize newer, non-traditional tools such as instant messaging, people analytics, etc.  Another key trend: reference checks will be vetted differently than in the past, with supervisory references gaining increasing prominence.

Some specific trends we expect to see for 2017 include:

  1. Workplace well-being becomes critical for attracting new talent. While compensation pay has traditionally been a leading prerequisite for all job seekers, a desire for workplace flexibility has risen dramatically in importance. Yet, it is estimated that only a third of global corporations offer such flexibility. Of those that do offer at least some degree of workplace flexibility, many are not promoting this benefit to job seekers who increasingly spend more time researching companies before applying for new employment.

This suggests a considerable opportunity for companies to not only increase their degree of workplace flexibility, but to market this benefit more aggressively to prospective new employees.

There are several components to overall work flex, which include:

  • Working from the home, facilitated using new technological tools
  • Elimination of strict office hours
  • Adoption of “casual days” with reduced formal business attire

2. New Internal Communications Tools Replace Email.  As highly tech-savvy employees enter the marketplace, businesses will utilize more efficient internal communication tools such as text messaging, live chat and instant messaging, which will increasingly replace traditional emails.

3. Blended Workplaces Become Increasingly Predominant. The use of blended workforces, where freelance workers team up with full-time employees on project collaboration, is on the rise. An estimated 40% of workforces will be composed of freelancers in the next few years, reducing corporate benefits/health care costs. By necessity, these freelancers will need to interact more frequently with full-time employees than previously.

4. The Reference Checking Process Takes an Unconventional Turn.  A significant change in the reference checking process is that employers are more likely to call a job seeker’s former supervisors, rather than follow the traditional route of contacting Human Resources.  This is because employers have concluded that former supervisors tend to be far more talkative about previous employees than Human Resources – and a talkative, knowledgeable reference is exactly what they seek.

Related to this, a 2014 survey by the Workplace Bullying Institute (workplacebullying.org) identified 27% of responders as having current or past direct experience with abusive conduct at work.  Bosses constituted the majority of bullies. (http://www.workplacebullying.org/wbiresearch/wbi-2014-us-survey/)

5.  References Become a Powerful Extension of a Job Seeker’s Resume. A strong resume is only part of the employment equation. Employers look to references to provide critical employment information, and a wise job seeker should treat their references as a powerful extension of their resume.  References should be chosen careful, and job seekers should have a cultivated list of references readily available (in a similar format/font as their resume) to be given to prospective employers.  See a modern reference list here: https://www.allisontaylor.com/sample-employment-reference-list.asp

6. Virtual reality tools revolutionize recruiting and training.  Revenue from virtual reality hardware is projected to reach over eight billion (2014-2018). It is likely that employees experiencing this technology outside of work will ultimately desire similar technological tools at the office. Some companies such as General Mills already utilize a virtual reality tour of their offices as a tool to showcase the company to prospective employees at corporate job fairs.

 

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About AllisonTaylor

AllisonTaylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. We are highly acclaimed with employers, employees and the media alike. Compliments and mentions from influential publications and writers at The Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, The New York Times, Workplace Bullying Institute, ABC Newswire, Forbes, USA Today, Hcareers, Fortune and MyFox News provide insight into our services. AllisonTaylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit http://www.allisontaylor.com/.

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Your Resignation Letter – What If You’re Leaving on Bad Terms?

Be Sure Your Resignation Letter Doesn’t “Burn a Bridge” with a Former Employer

DETROIT (July 20, 2016) – While crafting a resignation letter is simple enough when you’re leaving an employer on civil terms, what do you do if you’re parting on less than favorable circumstances?  Before you give any employer a “piece of your mind”, consider that a prospective new employer will likely call your employer at some future date.  Writing a resignation note in anger or haste could become an action you will later regret.

However, this does not mean that your letter cannot reflect legitimate concerns regarding appropriate company policy, or the way that you may have been treated.  The key is a respectful tone designed to give an employer thoughtful consideration to the concerns you are addressing.  Written properly, your letter might even result in further investigation or remedial action by an employer concerned that their actions may have violated company policy, or the law.

Below are some examples of how your resignation letter might be worded. Click here to see the full text of these letters.

Example #1: Resignation due to bullying, harassment, age discrimination or sexual overtones

“As you may or may not be aware, some members of your management team do not adhere to appropriate company policy.   Accordingly, I regretfully tender my resignation having experienced unsuitable corporate behavior.”

See the full letter here.

 

Example #2: Resignation due to Philosophical Differences

“Please accept this as my official notice of my resignation.

As you are aware, over the last twelve months we have had numerous differences of opinion regarding best practices and goals for the company’s Global project.

Unfortunately, it is clear to me that you and I will be unable to resolve our differences. Therefore, I feel that my resignation is the best option for the team and all concerned.”

See the full letter here.

 

Once your resignation has taken effect, you will want to ensure that your former employer offers no unfavorable commentary about you to prospective new employers.  A prudent first step would be to have an organization like Allison & Taylor (http://www.allisontaylor.com) conduct a reference check on your behalf, typically with your former supervisor and Human Resources (the two parties most likely to be contacted by potential new employers).  If their commentary is in any way unfavorable, you will have some form of recourse – e.g. through a Cease & Desist letter – in discouraging them from offering such commentary again.  (The success rate of these letters is extremely high.)

In summary, be sure to craft your resignation letter with the same care that you would with a resume or cover letter.  To the best of your ability, leave on good terms with an employer to ensure your next job offer is presented sooner, than later.

 

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About Allison & Taylor:

Allison & Taylor and its principals have been in the business of checking references for corporations and individuals since 1984. Allison & Taylor  is headquartered in Rochester, Mich. For further details on services and procedures please visit http://www.allisontaylor.com/.

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Hiring should be increasing over the next 3 years

The race is on

As global CEOs race to secure the talent, innovation and capabilities for growth – are Canadian CEOs keeping pace?

KPMG recently conducted a survey of nearly 1,300 CEOs from around the world, including 53 Canadian CEOs, asking them about their plans and concerns over the next three years and what we heard provides some interesting insights.

Optimism is high

Overall, Canadian CEOs are confident in the outlook of their organizations and industries, and their ability to outperform against the general economic backdrop. They are embracing technology, leveraging data and analytics, and pursuing innovation.

While this all sounds promising, are Canadian CEOs truly focusing on the right issues and taking full advantage of the best solutions? The significant contrasts that exist from their global counterparts suggest that Canadian CEOs may want to take more cues from our international peers.

The race is on

Clearly, Canadian executives are feeling that the race is on; but it remains to be seen whether they act quickly enough and with the right focus to effectively transform and evolve. Among our findings:

  • 75 percent of CEOs agree that the next three years will be more critical to their industry than the previous 50 years;
  • 74 percent of CEOs believe their company will remain largely the same in the next 3 years;
  • 98 percent are concerned about the loyalty of customers;
  • 13 percent feel confident that they are fully prepared for a cyber-event.

Explore the report

We hope that you find this report and the insights provided useful and of interest to you and your organization.

Read the full report [PDF 2 MB]

WORKING REMOTELY … REMOTE WORKERS SEE A 20% TO 55% INCREASE IN PRODUCTIVITY

Working remotely
… remote workers see a 20% to 55% increase in productivity

By 2020, it’s expected that half of the workforce will be remote. This is not only something employees are demanding, but it is being legislated in countries like the UK. One survey found that 43 percent of employees would take a flex work arrangement over a raise. There are many big-name companies that support remote work for a surprising variety of jobs. Flexibility includes the option to work less for less pay; for example, a four-day work week. Flex work is extending into vacation policy with companies like Netflix and Virgin moving to unlimited leave policies to help drive productivity of creatives in an outcome-based work environment.  (page 29)

Companies get around talent shortage with ‘work from anywhere’ policies

70% of employees would quit their jobs for a remote-working one

Offices are some of the worst places to truly get any work done

Traditionalists, beware: the new work space is everywhere

Why It’s Time to Allow Employees to Work Remotely

5 awesome lessons I learned from working remotely

4 Reasons Marissa Mayer’s No-At-Home-Work Policy Is an Epic Fail

Millennials are forcing Canadian firms to up their mobile game

70% of millennial workers would rather telecommute than come to the office

Report shows flexible work options leads to higher employee engagement

How to manage a workforce that’s spread around the globe

How a manager can be visible, remotely

Companies are failing to invest in the tools that make remote working a reality

The rise of remote working

At These 125 Companies, All Or Most Employees Work Remotely

Five Ways A Company Can Set Up Remote Workers For Success

Future of work is when employees want, where they want it: Rogers survey

10 Tips for Effective Collaboration in Remote Teams

UNLIMITED VACATION TIME: AWESOME, OR NAH-SOME?

Unlimited Vacation time: Awesome, or Nah-some?

Quebec nurse earns $315Gs by working overtime

MONTREAL – A part-time nurse at a Montreal hospital has earned over $315,000 in the past year through overtime and bonuses, raising questions about workloads, staffing and hospital spending priorities.

The nurse at Jean-Talon hospital made $315,284.18 in the 2011-12 fiscal year, QMI Agency has learned.

That’s nearly twice the salary of her hospital’s CEO and considerably more than Quebec Premier Pauline Marois, who makes $177,000 a year.

Read more here

Canadian CEOs recall best advice they got on the road to the top

Special to Financial Post | Jan 8, 2013 1:03 PM ET

In North America, research shows 75% of executives say mentoring played a key role in their careers. Equally, 77% of companies report that mentoring programs were effective in increasing employee retention; 35% of employees confirmed this admitting they would look for another job within 12 months if they did not receive regular mentoring. More.